Our Favorite Pickled Eggs

This is our favorite recipe for pickled eggs, a spring treat when the hens start laying a lot of eggs!

It’s similar to “German” pickled egg recipes and came from a Montana pioneer friend that he got

from his mother. These are great to eat plain, or make a superb egg sandwich, egg salad, chef

salad, or deviled eggs!

 

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Our Favorite Pickled Eggs


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Mark & Jill Baker

Ingredients

Scale

Ingredients

1 c. Apple Juice

1 1/2 c. Apple Cider Vinegar

3 Tbsp. Soy Sauce

4 Garlic Cloves, peeled

1 tsp. Dry Mustard

1 tsp. Ground Cloves

12 Eggs, hard boiled


Instructions

Instructions

  1. Peel the 12 eggs and place in glass jars.
  2. Combine the rest of the ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil.
  3. Pour brine over eggs to cover them. Put the lid on securely.
  4. Chill for 24 hours, The eggs get more flavorful the longer they sit.
  5. Eggs will keep in the fridge for several weeks.

Notes

**Note: These are not shelf stable and must be kept refrigerated.**

 

All About…Brining

 

 

Farming website logo

 

Brining, or soaking food in heavily salted water, is a very old method for preserving and curing foods. The meat is submerged, for hours or days, depending on its weight, in a salt solution, and during this time osmosis occurs, increasing the amount of liquid inside the meat’s cells. The result is a juicier, more flavorful piece of meat. While brine is simply a mixture of water and salt, most brines are balanced by the addition of sugar and enhanced with herbs and spices.

Use a nonreactive container for brining, such as glass or stainless steel bowl or even a plastic bucket. The container must be large enough to submerge the odd bit completely in the brining solution, but small enough to fit in your refrigerator. Try to find one that is just wide enough to hold the meat–it the meat fits snugly in the container, you don’t have to add as much brine.

To estimate how much brine to make, place the odd bit you want to brine in the container and pour over enough cold water to cover. Remove the odd bit, then pour the water into a measuring jug. You can brine several odd bits in the same brine.

Your brining solution must be cold before you pour it over the meat, and you may have to weigh down the meat with a plate and a weight so it’s totally submerged. (I’ve found plastic containers filled with water or stones work well as weights.)

Cover the container with plastic and refrigerate for:
º 1/2 to 1 day for pork or lamb tongues
º 2 days for pig’s ears and tails
º 2 to 3 days for calf’s or beef tongue
º 2 to 3 days for split pig’s head and feet

When you remove the meat from the brine, rinse the meat well under cold water and discard the brine.

 

The information and recipe, contained within, is excerpted from Odd Bits by Jennifer McLagan and can be purchased here.

All-Purpose Brine

 

 

This recipe should make enough brine for half a pig’s head weighing 6 pounds; half the recipe will be enough for a beef tongue weighing 3 pounds or the equivalent weight of pork or lamb tongues.

 

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

All-Purpose Brine


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 1 Gallon 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale

8 oz. Coarse Sea Salt

1 c. Brown Sugar

1 Tbsp. Toasted Coriander Seeds, crushed

1 Tbsp. Black Peppercorns, crushed

1/2 tsp. Allspice Berries, crushed

1/2 tsp. Juniper Berries, crushed

4 Cloves Garlic, crushed

4 Large Sprigs Fresh Thyme

4 Fresh Bay Leaves

1 gallon Water


Instructions

  1. Place the salt, sugar, coriander, peppercorns, allspice, juniper, garlic, thyme, and bay leaves in a saucepan.
  2. Add 8 cups of water, then place over medium heat and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the salt and sugar. Boil for 2 minutes, then remove from the heat.
  3. Pour into a glass container, add the remaining water and leave to cool completely.
  4. Now the brine is ready to use. Thoroughly rinse the odd bit to be brined, pat dry, and place in the brine following the recipe instructions.

Notes

See information about brining here.

The information and recipe, contained within, is excerpted from Odd Bits by Jennifer McLagan and can be purchased here.

Brine for Pork

 

 

Although brining, soaking food in a heavily slated water, has been heralded as a new way to impart flavor to today’s lean pork, it is really a very old method used for preserving foods. When the meat is submerged, for hours or as long as a day or two, depending on its weight, in a salt solution, osmosis takes place, which increases the amount of liquid inside the meat’s cells. The result is a juicier, more flavorful piece of meat.

While a basic brine is simply a mixture of water and salt, most brines are balanced by the addition of sugar, and they can, like this one, be further enhanced with herbs and spices. Use a nonreactive container for brining, such as a glass or stainless steel bowl or even a plastic bucket, the container must be large enough to submerge the meat completely in the brining solution. This recipe makes enough brine for a crown roast of pork; it can easily be halved for brining a smaller piece of meat.

Follow the instructions for the recipe being used as brining times depends on the size and shape of the cut. Ensure the brining solution is cold before adding the meat.

 

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Brine for Pork


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: Makes 1 Gallon 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale

1 c. Kosher Salt

1/2 c. Sugar

1 Tbsp. Coriander Seeds, crushed

1 Tbsp. Black Peppercorns, crushed

8 Allspice Berries, crushed

6 Juniper Berries, crushed

4 Garlic Cloves, crushed

4 Bay Leaves, crushed

4 Thyme Sprigs


Instructions

  1. Put the salt, sugar, and 4 cups water in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the salt and sugar. Boil for 1 minute, them remove from the heat and pour into the brining container. Add the coriander seeds, peppercorns, allspice, and juniper berries, garlic, bay leaves, and thyme, and pour in 12 c. cold water.
  2. Once the brining solution is completely cool, add the meat. To submerge the meat, weigh it down using a plate and a jar filled with water. (Do not use a metal weight or jar with a metal lid, as it would react with the brine.)
  3. Refrigerate the meat in the brine according to the individual recipe instructions.

Notes

The information and recipe, contained within, is excerpted from Bones by Jennifer McLagan and can be purchased here.

Pork Stock

 

 

Admittedly not as useful as veal or chicken stock, pork stock nonetheless makes a good basis for certain soups and for sauces to accompany pork. Use only uncured pork bones to make it. The smoky flavor of ham bones or those from other cured cuts would overpower the stock; they are best added to lentils or beans.

As with any bones, they can be saved in the freezer until you have enough, or ask you butcher to set them aside for you. Skin, feet, and ears are good additions to the stock because they increase the gelatin content. A small pig’s foot (have your butcher cut it into pieces) or a piece of skin about 6 inches square, with the fat removed, will be enough for this stock. Add either one with the bones.

 

Print
clock clock iconcutlery cutlery iconflag flag iconfolder folder iconinstagram instagram iconpinterest pinterest iconfacebook facebook iconprint print iconsquares squares iconheart heart iconheart solid heart solid icon

Pork Stock


5 Stars 4 Stars 3 Stars 2 Stars 1 Star

No reviews

  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: Makes 6 to 7 cups 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale

4 1/2 lbs. Meaty Pork Bones, cut into 2-to-3-inch pieces

1 Small Pig’s Foot, cut into pieces, optional

2 Medium Carrots, sliced

2 Medium Carrots, sliced

2 Celery Stalks, sliced

1 Large Onion, unpeeled, cut into wedges

Green Tops of 3 Leeks, sliced

6 Flat-Leaf Parsley Stems

1 Large Thyme Sprig

1 Bay Leaf

A Large Strip of Lemon Zest

3 Garlic Cloves

1/4 tsp. Black Peppercorns

Kosher Salt, optional


Instructions

  1. Rinse the bones and foot, if using, under cold running water, then place in a large stockpot. Add the carrots, celery, onion, leeks, parsley, thyme, bay leaf, lemon zest, and garlic. Pour in enough cold water to cover the bones, about 12 cups, and bring slowly to a boil. As soon as the stock begins to boil, reduce the heat so that it simmers. Using a soup ladle, skin off any scum that has risen to the surface (rotate it’s bowl on the surface of the stock to make ripples: these will carry the scum to the edges of the pot, and you can then use the ladle to lift it off.) Add the peppercorns and simmer, uncovered, for 5 hours, skimming from time to time.
  2. Strain the stock through a sieve into a large bowl. Discard the debris left in the sieve, and cool the stock quickly by placing the bowl in a larger bowl or sink filled with ice water; stir occasionally as it cools. When you taste the stock, you will notice that something is missing–the salt. It was deliberately left out so that you can reduce the stock, if desired, without any fear that it will become too salty. If you will not be reducing the stock, add about 1 tsp. salt.
  3. Refrigerate the stock for 6 hours, or overnight, to allow the fat to rise to the top and the debris to sink to the bottom. Remove the fat before using (and discard the debris at the bottom of the bowl). Divide into 1-cup quantities and refrigerate for up to 3 days or freeze for up to 6 months.

Notes

Concentrated Pork Stock (Makes 1 1/2 cups)
If your freezer pace is tight, reduce your stock by following the method for Concentrated Brown Stock (found here).
º6 cups Unsalted Pork Stock
ºKosher Salt
The reduced stock will become syrupy and turn a deep golden color.

The information and recipe, contained within, is excerpted from Bones by Jennifer McLagan and can be purchased here.