Grilled Chicken Heart Skewers

 

 

This recipe is so simple, so delicious, and so crowd-pleasing. It’s also an friendly entry into the world of heart, since chicken hearts are mild and meaty and easy to work with. They are an excellent addition to a summer BBQ, a great protein-filled appetizer, or a quick Paleo-friendly entrée next to a mixed salad or cauliflower rice.

 

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Grilled Chicken Heart Skewers


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 6 Servings 1x

Ingredients

Units Scale

1 lb. Chicken Hearts, cleaned *see here*

1 Red Onion, chopped into 1-inch pieces

1 Bell Pepper, any color or combination, chopped into 1-inch pieces

6 (10-inch) Wood Skewers, soaked in water for 1 hour

Lime Wedges, for serving

For the Marinade
1/3 c. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

3 Tbsp. Red Wine Vinegar

1/2 tsp. Fine Sea Salt

1/2 tsp. Ground Cumin

1/4 tsp. Ground Black Pepper

1/4 tsp. Cayenne Pepper


Instructions

  1. Put all the ingredients for the marinade in a medium mixing bowl and mix well. Pat the hearts dry and add them to the marinade, tossing them to coat. Cover the bowl and place in the fridge to marinate overnight.
  2. Preheat a barbecue grill to high heat, or preheat a grill pan on the stovetop over high heat.
  3. Skewer the hearts with a slice of onion or bell pepper between them, for a total of 4 or 5 hearts per skewer. Grill until slightly charred on the surface and medium-rare inside, about 4 minutes per side, turning the skewers over midway through cooking.
  4. Serve immediately with a squeeze of lime.

Notes

Leftover skewers will keep for up to 5 days in the fridge.

Recipe is an excerpt from It Takes Guts by Ashleigh Vanhoute and can be purchased here.

Golden Chicken Bone Broth

 

 

A nutrient-packed broth containing yellow onion, turmeric, lemon, and carrot; hence the name golden!

Yellow and orange vegetables are high in beta-carotene, flavonoids, lycopene, potassium, and vitamin C, which can assist with eye health, fight free radicals, help lower blood pressure and LDL cholesterol, and promote collagen formation, which is a synergistic effect when combined with the yummy collagen from the chicken bones.

Many people let their broth simmer for up to 3 days, but this recipe, made with a little less water than you may be used to, creates a super thick, rich broth after just 24 hours. It’s so concentrated that you may be able to dilute it when using it as a flavorful cooking liquid for rice or pasta, but it’s perfect warmed up in a mug; the rich, healthy fat has a luxurious mouthfeel, and the lemon and turmeric gives you that warming, mouth-tingling feeling.

This recipe is perfect for the winter months or when you’re feeling a little run-down. Pro-Tip: Pour the broth into an ice cube tray or silicone mold to freeze and store–add a couple cubes to your morning smoothie or just heat them up when you need a cup.

 

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Golden Chicken Bone Broth


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 3 Cups 1x

Description

 

To understand the differences between stock and broth, go here.

 


Ingredients

Units Scale

1 Chicken Carcass

2 c. Filtered Water, plus more as needed

2 Tbsp. Apple Cider Vinegar

2 Large Carrots, scrubbed and roughly chopped

1 Yellow Onion, roughly chopped

2 Cloves Garlic, roughly chopped

1 Lemon, sliced (with peel on)

2 tsp. Fine Sea Salt

1 1/2 tsp. Ground Black Pepper

1 1/2 tsp. Turmeric Powder


Instructions

  1. Put the chicken carcass in a 6-quart slow cooker.
  2. Pour in the water and vinegar, making sure the carcass is covered by about an inch of water.
  3. Let sit without turning on the heat for 30 minutes. (Prep the veggies during this time.)
  4. Add all the vegetables and the lemon slices to the slow cooker and add more filtered water until the ingredients are covered by about an inch of water.
  5. Add the salt, pepper, and turmeric powder.
  6. Cook on low for 12-24 hours, topping off with more filtered water when the liquid evaporates below the bones.
  7. Remove all the large solids with tongs or a slotted spoon.
  8. Using a fine-mesh strainer, strain the both into a 1-quart mason jar and discard the solids.

Notes

The broth will keep for up to a week in the fridge OR up to 3 months in the freezer.

Information and recipe excerpted from It Takes Guts by Ashleigh Vanhoute and can be purchased here.

Schmaltz

 

 

What on earth is schmaltz?

Schmaltz is simply rendered chicken fat (although you can utilize goose, duck, and even turkey as well.)

 

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Schmaltz


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 2 cups 1x

Ingredients

Scale

1 lb. Chicken Fat and Skin

1 White Onion, diced

Salt

Pepper


Instructions

  1. Rinse and pound the skin, then chop rough into 1-inch pieces.
  2. Pat dry, then place in a nonstick pan over low heat.
  3. Cover and cook for 15 minutes, stirring occasionally.
  4. Turn up heat to medium low and break apart skin.
  5. Add the white onion and season with salt and pepper.
  6. Keep stirring until the fat turns golden brown.
  7. Strain through a fine-mesh sieve. The resulting liquid is schmaltz, a yellowish fat.

Notes

The strained skin and fat can be used to make chicken skin bacon. Place the cooked skin and one diced onion in a nonstick pan. Season with salt and pepper and cook on medium heat until golden brown. When the skin is caramelized, dump it onto a tray lined with paper towels. These make a great addition to salad.

When stored in the refrigerator, schmaltz will keep for weeks.

Information contained within is an excerpt from The New Charcuterie Cookbook by Jamie Bissonnette. Purchase the book here.

Chicken Liver Pâté

 

 

This silky-smooth pâté is inexpensive and simple to make. The chicken livers are briefly simmered in water with aromatics before they’re blended with butter in a food processor. If you have the opportunity to choose, shop for paler chicken livers; they tend to have a mellower, rich flavor than deep-red ones.

 

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liver, grass fed, beef, pork

Chicken Liver Pâté


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  • Author: Jill Baker

Ingredients

Units Scale

1/2 lb. Chicken Livers, well-trimmed

1/2 Small Onion, thinly sliced

1 Small Garlic Clove, smashed and peeled

1 Bay Leaf

1/4 tsp. Thyme Leaves

Kosher Salt

1/2 c. Water

1 1/2 Sticks Unsalted Butter, at room temp

2 tsp. Cognac or Scotch Whisky

Freshly Ground Pepper

Toasted Baguette Slices, for serving


Instructions

Step 1

In a medium saucepan, combine the chicken livers, onion, garlic, bay leaf, thyme, and 1/2 tsp of salt. Add the water and bring to a simmer. Cover, reduce the heat to low and cook, stirring occasionally, until the livers are barely pink inside, about 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and let stand, covered, for 5 minutes.

Step 2

Discard the bay leaf. Using a slotted spoon, transfer the livers, onion, and garlic to a food processor; process until coarsely pureed. With the machine on, add the butter, 2 tablespoons at a time, until incorporated. Add the Cognac, season with salt and pepper and process until completely smooth. Scrape the pâté into 2 or 3 large ramekins. Press a piece or plastic wrap directly onto the surface of the pâté and refrigerate until firm. Serve chilled.

Notes

Make Ahead
The pâté can be covered with a thin layer of melted bitter, then wrapped in plastic and refrigerated for up to 1 week or frozen for up to 2 months.

Variation: you can add in 8 oz. of softened cream cheese for a smoother, creamier consistency. Our very own Faelan Baker recommended this when she makes her pâté.

Recipe is excerpted from Food & Wine website, attributed by Jacques Pépin.

Chicken Fried Heart

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Chicken Fried Heart


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  • Author: Jill Baker

Description

This simple, yet nutrient dense recipe is one of the best ways to eat heart! Traditionally done in an old seasoned cast iron skillet, I’m sure you can certainly try out those new air fryers and these will still turn out perfect!


Ingredients

Heart (1/4″ thick pieces)

Seasoned Flour, season with whatever herbs and spices you enjoy

Fat, lard is perfect here

Hot Water


Instructions

  1. Dip in seasoned flour. Brown on both sides in hot fat.
  2. Add a small amount of hot water. 
  3. Cover and simmer 20-30 minutes.

Notes

Source of IRON, magnesium, phosphorous, zinc, selenium, all the B vitamins, but especially B12 (383% of the USRDA). Collagen, elastin, amino acids; all that equals energy, mental clarity, good immune function, and good cellular function.

In addition, heart is full of CoQ10 and and peptides specific to heart function. In natural healing there’s a principle of “like treats like.” Beef, chicken, pork, and lamb heart (and any others) help strengthen your heart! And a stronger circulatory system equals many things, including better fertility.

This recipe is brought to you from Baker’s Green Acres’ very own Jill Baker.

Chicken Liver “Butter”

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Chicken Liver “Butter”


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 8 appetizer portions 1x

Description

Although titled “butter”, don’t let that word fool you. This is very much a spreadable pâté, yet, with the addition of real butter into it, it will be a lighter, fluffier spread.

Always remember to take the spread out of the fridge and allow to warm a bit before serving. Perfect with cooked eggs, some capers, and minced red onion!


Ingredients

Units Scale

2 Tbsp. (30 grams) Kosher Salt, plus more if needed
2 c. (480 ml.) Water
1 lb. (450 grams) Chicken Livers, veins and connective tissue removed

Freshly Ground Black Pepper, to taste

2 Tbsp. Vegetable Oil
1/2 c. (110 grams) Onion, finely sliced
1/4 (60 ml.) Brandy
1 lb. (450 grams) Unsalted Butter, at room temperature


Instructions

To Prep the Livers:
1. Dissolve salt in the water in a bowl.
2. Place cleaned livers into bowl and place in the refrigerator to soak overnight (or a min. of 4 hours at the very least.)
3. Remove soaked livers and pat dry.
4. Season with salt and pepper

To Prepare the Spread:
1. Sear livers in an oiled sauté pan over medium-high heat, about a minute on each side.
2. Add in the onions and continue to cook until the livers are fully cooked. Onions should be soft.
3. Add brandy and reduce to a syrup. Set aside to cool to room temperature.

To complete:
1. Puree liver, onion, and reduced syrup in a food processer until smooth.
2. Add softened, room temperature butter into processor in three stages, ensuring to scrap the sides down with each addition.
3. Puree until mixture is light in color and butter is fully incorporated.

Final step (this is key)
1. Run mixture through a tamis or fine mesh strainer.
2. Place final spread into a mold OR simply add into a dish that has a tight fitting lid, chill in refrigerator.
3. Best served the next day.

Notes

The use of vegetable oil for frying is important here as it won’t impart a flavor on the chicken livers. This ensures the flavor profile stays consistent with chicken livers.

Ensure the livers have all the veins and connective tissue removed.

Always run the puree through a tamis or fine mesh strainer.

This excerpt was taken from Pâté, Confit, Rillette, Brian Polcyn with Michael Ruhlman

To purchase the book, click the title above!