Parsley Salad

 

 

This salad is typically served, English style, with Roasted Marrow Bones and rustic bread.

Parsley mixed with the pale green leaves from celery hearts and peppery wild arugula cuts through the richness of the marrow. Be sure to use flat-leaf parsley. If the leaves are big, tear them into smaller pieces. Dress the salad just before serving, and be sparing with the salt because of the fleur de sel that will top the marrow.

 

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Parsley Salad


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  • Author: Jill Baker

Ingredients

Units Scale

3 c. Mixed Flat-Leaf Parsley, Celery (pale green), and Arugula Leaves

1 Tbsp. Finely Diced Shallot

2 tsp. Capers, preferably salt-packed, rinsed and chopped

2 Tbsp. Extra-Virgin Olive Oil

2 tsp. Freshly Squeezed Lemon Juice

Kosher Salt & Freshly Ground Black Pepper


Instructions

  1. Place the leaves, shallot, and capers in a medium bowl.
  2. Whisk together the oil and lemon juice in a glass measuring cup or a small bowl, then season very lightly with salt and generously with pepper.
  3. Toss the salad with the dressing and serve.

Notes

The information and recipe, contained within, is excerpted from Bones by Jennifer McLagan and can be purchased here.

Sorrel, Chicory, and Crispy Ear Salad

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Sorrel, Chicory, and Crispy Ear Salad


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: Serves 8

Description

This is a fine accompaniment for Brawn (Headcheese). You will need the pig’s ears as cooked in that recipe.


Ingredients

Scale

2 Pig’s Ears, cooked

Vegetable Oil for Frying

2 Handfuls of Sorrel Leaves, picked from the stems, washed and drained

2 Heads of Chicory (also called Curly Endive or Belgian Endive)

A Handful of Curly Parsley Leaves, picked from the stem

1 Generous tsp. of Capers (extra-fine if possible)

Vinaigrette (recipe here)


Instructions

Allow the ears to cool and firm up, then slice very thinly. Heat the vegetable oil in a deep frying pan (or deep-fryer if you have one) and drop the ears in. Be careful, as even if dry they are likely to spit.

Stir to avoid their sticking in one great mass.

When crispy, remove from the oil and lay on paper towels to drain off excess fat.

Pick off the sorrel leaves, chop the chicory, and finely chop the curly parsley, add the capers, dress with vinaigrette, and then top with the crispy ears.

Notes

This excerpt is taken from The Whole Beast by Fergus Henderson, purchase the book here.

Pickled Ramps (Wild Leeks)

 

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Pickled Ramps (Wild Leeks)


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 1 pound 1x

Description

Known as wild leeks, ramps are in abundance from April through May. Mostly found while foraging (selected only from clean land and land that is not trespassed upon,) you can also find these at select farmer’s markets.

Should you wild forage, please take care with where you forage; know what exactly you are foraging for, only take some & leave many, and pay attention to the surroundings, obtain from clean areas (no run off from farms, roadsides, or places where chemicals/off-gassing occurs.)

Ramps (wild leeks) should be cut so that the root (bulb) stays intact in the ground; DO NOT pull the entire plant. This will ensure that your “source” will continue to regrow and create other leek (ramp) plants.

Pickling these delicious plants will allow you to enjoy them even after their season ends, which means throughout summer and even into winter!

These go best with Pâté, especially Pâté containing meat! If you don’t have access to ramps (wild or via farmer’s markets) you can utilize scallions as well.


Ingredients

Units Scale

1 lb. (450 grams) Ramps
3/4 c. (180ml) Water
1/2 c. (120 ml) White Wine Vinegar
1/2 c. (130 grams) Sugar
1 Tbsp. (15 grams) Kosher Salt
1 tsp. Whole Black Peppercorns
1 tsp. Yellow Mustard Seeds
1/2 tsp. Cumin Seeds
1/2 tsp. Caraway Seeds
1 Bay Leaf

Pot filled with salted water
Bowl for ice bath
Sheet pan and tea towels (or flour sack towels) for patting dry blanched ramps (leeks)
Container (heat-safe) with an air-tight lid
Saucepan to make “pickling” mixture


Instructions

To prepare the ramps:
1. Wash the ramps and trim the tops (greens), save for use in other things; like scrambled eggs.
2. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
3. Create an ice bath in separate bowl, set aside.
4. Add ramps (leeks) to the boiling water to blanch until just tender (only a minute or 2 max.)
5. Remove and blanch immediately in ice bath.
6. Remove from ice bath and transfer to sheet pan to pat dry.
7. Transfer dry ramps (leeks) into a heat-safe container that has an air tight lid.

To prepare the pickling mixture:
1. In saucepan, place remaining ingredients and bring to boil and add sugar until just dissolved.
2. Allow to cook for a few moments.
3. Pour mixture (while hot) over the ramps (leeks,) cover with tight lid, and cool to room temperature.

*Refrigerate for up to 3 weeks.*

Notes

This recipe is an excerpt from Pâté, Confit, Rillette by Brian Polcyn with Michael Ruhlman

You can get this book by clicking this link: click here

Dandelion Bacon Salad

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Dandelion Bacon Salad


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  • Author: Jill Baker

Description

This is a great way to incorporate wild greens into your diet. If you harvest wild greens be sure to get them from “clean”, unsprayed areas.


Ingredients

Scale

Dressing

  • 1/4 c. lemon juice or vinegar
  • 1/4 c. honey or sugar, more or less to taste
  • 1/8 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 c. evaporated milk (or fresh, raw whole milk)

Salad

  • 4 slices bacon
  • 1 Tbsp. flour
  • 8 c. dandelion greens chopped
  • hard cooked egg chopped

Instructions

  1. Blend lemon juice or vinegar, honey or sugar, and salt in a bowl. Stir in evaporated milk
  2. Fry 4 slices bacon in a large frypan and drain on paper towel.  Remove all but 1 Tbsp. bacon fat from the pan.  Crumble bacon and set aside.
  3. Add flour to reserved bacon fat in the fry pan, heat, and stir until smooth.  Slowly stir in the dressing mixture.  Heat and stir until thickened.  Turn off heat but leave pan on the burner.
  4. Add dandelion greens to warm dressing and stir gently to coat.  Garnish with bacon and chopped hard-cooked egg.

Notes

You can substitute escarole, endive, or Boston lettuce for the dandelion greens. Other choices include any of the dark leafy greens and suitable weeds like lambsquarter, dock, and amaranth (pigweed).

Other optional garnishes include red onion rings, mushrooms, or dried cherries.