Our Favorite Pickled Eggs

This is our favorite recipe for pickled eggs, a spring treat when the hens start laying a lot of eggs!

It’s similar to “German” pickled egg recipes and came from a Montana pioneer friend that he got

from his mother. These are great to eat plain, or make a superb egg sandwich, egg salad, chef

salad, or deviled eggs!

 

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Our Favorite Pickled Eggs


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  • Author: Mark & Jill Baker

Ingredients

Scale

Ingredients

1 c. Apple Juice

1 1/2 c. Apple Cider Vinegar

3 Tbsp. Soy Sauce

4 Garlic Cloves, peeled

1 tsp. Dry Mustard

1 tsp. Ground Cloves

12 Eggs, hard boiled


Instructions

Instructions

  1. Peel the 12 eggs and place in glass jars.
  2. Combine the rest of the ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil.
  3. Pour brine over eggs to cover them. Put the lid on securely.
  4. Chill for 24 hours, The eggs get more flavorful the longer they sit.
  5. Eggs will keep in the fridge for several weeks.

Notes

**Note: These are not shelf stable and must be kept refrigerated.**

 

Pickled Gherkins (Cornichons)

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Pickled Gherkins (Cornichons)


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 4 pounds gherkins 1x

Description

An incredibly useful thing to have up your sleeve!


Ingredients

Units Scale

3/4 c. Coarse Sea Salt

4 1/44 1/2 lbs. Gherkins

Pickling Spice (can purchase already made), contains celery seed, mustard seed, black peppercorns, small dried red chilies, coriander seed, and dill seed

4 c. Sugar

3 Tbsp. Acetic Acid

5 c. Water


Instructions

Wash your gherkins, sprinkle them with salt, and leave to stand for 2-3 hours, occasionally tossing them gently. Shake off the salt and place the gherkins in a bowl, cover with clean boiling water, leave them to stand for 5 minutes. Drain.

Place gherkins in clean, sterile, sealable jars, adding a healthy pinch of pickling spice to each jar. Meanwhile, place the sugar, acid, and water in a stainless-steel pan and bring to a boil until the sugar and acid has dissolved fully.

Pour over gherkins.

Seal jars while liquor is hot. Keep in your cupboard for at least a month prior to consuming.

Notes

This canning method is not approved by the USDA. Please seek out up-to-date canning methods.

This excerpt is taken from The Whole Beast by Fergus Henderson, purchase the book here.

Pickled Ramps (Wild Leeks)

 

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Pickled Ramps (Wild Leeks)


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  • Author: Jill Baker
  • Yield: 1 pound 1x

Description

Known as wild leeks, ramps are in abundance from April through May. Mostly found while foraging (selected only from clean land and land that is not trespassed upon,) you can also find these at select farmer’s markets.

Should you wild forage, please take care with where you forage; know what exactly you are foraging for, only take some & leave many, and pay attention to the surroundings, obtain from clean areas (no run off from farms, roadsides, or places where chemicals/off-gassing occurs.)

Ramps (wild leeks) should be cut so that the root (bulb) stays intact in the ground; DO NOT pull the entire plant. This will ensure that your “source” will continue to regrow and create other leek (ramp) plants.

Pickling these delicious plants will allow you to enjoy them even after their season ends, which means throughout summer and even into winter!

These go best with Pâté, especially Pâté containing meat! If you don’t have access to ramps (wild or via farmer’s markets) you can utilize scallions as well.


Ingredients

Units Scale

1 lb. (450 grams) Ramps
3/4 c. (180ml) Water
1/2 c. (120 ml) White Wine Vinegar
1/2 c. (130 grams) Sugar
1 Tbsp. (15 grams) Kosher Salt
1 tsp. Whole Black Peppercorns
1 tsp. Yellow Mustard Seeds
1/2 tsp. Cumin Seeds
1/2 tsp. Caraway Seeds
1 Bay Leaf

Pot filled with salted water
Bowl for ice bath
Sheet pan and tea towels (or flour sack towels) for patting dry blanched ramps (leeks)
Container (heat-safe) with an air-tight lid
Saucepan to make “pickling” mixture


Instructions

To prepare the ramps:
1. Wash the ramps and trim the tops (greens), save for use in other things; like scrambled eggs.
2. Bring a pot of salted water to a boil.
3. Create an ice bath in separate bowl, set aside.
4. Add ramps (leeks) to the boiling water to blanch until just tender (only a minute or 2 max.)
5. Remove and blanch immediately in ice bath.
6. Remove from ice bath and transfer to sheet pan to pat dry.
7. Transfer dry ramps (leeks) into a heat-safe container that has an air tight lid.

To prepare the pickling mixture:
1. In saucepan, place remaining ingredients and bring to boil and add sugar until just dissolved.
2. Allow to cook for a few moments.
3. Pour mixture (while hot) over the ramps (leeks,) cover with tight lid, and cool to room temperature.

*Refrigerate for up to 3 weeks.*

Notes

This recipe is an excerpt from Pâté, Confit, Rillette by Brian Polcyn with Michael Ruhlman

You can get this book by clicking this link: click here

Pickled Eggs

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Pickled eggs


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No reviews

  • Author: Jill Baker

Ingredients

Scale
  • 1 c. Apple Juice
  • 1 1/2 c. Apple Cider Vinegar
  • 3 Tbsp. Soy Sauce
  • 4 Cloves Garlic, peeled
  • 1 tsp. Dry Mustard
  • 1 tsp. Ground Cloves
  • 12 Eggs, hard boiled

Instructions

  1. Peel the 12 eggs and place in glass jars.

  2. Combine the rest of the ingredients in a pot and bring to a boil.

  3. Pour brine over eggs to cover them.  Put lid on securely.

  4. Chill for 24 hours.  The eggs get more flavorful the longer they sit.

  5. Eggs will keep in the fridge for several weeks.